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Bromeliads for damp gardens
GROWING CONDITIONS KEY:

SHADE
partial shade
PART SHADE
sunny
SUN
epiphyte
EPIPHYTE
terrestrial
TERRESTRIAL
tropical
TROPICAL
cold hardy
COLD HARDY
damp
DAMP

Each Bromeliad will have more than one preferred growing situation, as most Bromeliads are very adaptable. The symbols explain where they are best suited in the garden, which is not necessarily the situation they are found in the wild. Where the variety is quite happy in more than one situation, several symbols will be used together, for example epiphyte and terrestrial together. Where only one symbol is used, the variety is not likely to prefer other situations.


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  Nidularium amazonicum: Olive green leaves with burgundy edges on top and rusty red colouring underneath make this an attractive plant. Similar to Nidularium innocentii, which has white flowers as opposed to the green flowers of this species.

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  Nidularium longiflorum: A recent import from Brazil, this lovely Nidularium has large rosettes of wide moss green leaves, up to 70cm across. At flowering, centre bracts of soft pink or light red appear, with long white flowers arising from the centre.

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  Pitcairnia flammea: This native of Eastern Brazil loves moist soil and shady conditions. Tall graceful arching leaves of deep green are perfect as a background for the nearly 50cm high vivid red flower spikes that appear profusely.

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  Pitcairnia heterophylla: This plant has a grasslike appearance, except for the base, which is bulbous and quite spiny. It is one of the few deciduous Bromeliads. The very showy red petalled flowers with green bracts appear in spring. Ideal for moist shady areas in the garden where it will quickly clump up.