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Bromeliads for light shade
GROWING CONDITIONS KEY:

SHADE
partial shade
PART SHADE
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SUN
epiphyte
EPIPHYTE
terrestrial
TERRESTRIAL
tropical
TROPICAL
cold hardy
COLD HARDY
damp
DAMP

Each Bromeliad will have more than one preferred growing situation, as most Bromeliads are very adaptable. The symbols explain where they are best suited in the garden, which is not necessarily the situation they are found in the wild. Where the variety is quite happy in more than one situation, several symbols will be used together, for example epiphyte and terrestrial together. Where only one symbol is used, the variety is not likely to prefer other situations.


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  Acanthostachys strobilacea: This small wiry plant is very cute, with tiny yellow and red pineapples which appear just before the Christmas. Very long lasting colour and easy care, needs high light levels, so can be grown successfully on balconies or in the garden. Great in hanging baskets and pots also.
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  Aechmea 'Ann Vincent': A hybrid of Aechmea calyculata and Aechmea caudata. This is an excellent large plant for landscaping. Broad dusty green leaves with blueish tips and bases, slightly tinged with rose.

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  Aechmea apocalyptica: The royal blue and vibrant orange flowers of this small Aechmea really do look like the flames of the apocalypse. Dark olive green leaves, forming a small, upright rosette. Very hardy and able to withstand salt spray, wind etc.

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  Aechmea apocalyptica x gamosepala: A lovely plant for mass planting. Olive green leaves, forming a medium sized upright rosette. Colourful light red bracts with baby blue flowers, which appear over winter.

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  Aechmea 'Burgundy': Absolutely stunning Aechmea with shiny, deep Burgundy leaves. The rosette grows to approximately 70cm across. The flower spike is unusual, consisting of burgundy berries tipped with white. Colour holds well in shade, but is best grown in good light, avoiding the midday sun.

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  Aechmea candida: A medium size rosette up to 60cm in diameter, green leaves covered with grey scales. The flower spike is unusual in that it is covered with a white wooly substance. The colour is pale pink with white petals, all of which, except the petals, are covered in the wool.

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  Aechmea caudata: Red bracts and lime yellow florets appear on a metre tall, branched flower stem. Stiff grey green leaves tinged with blue on the tips, form a tall but slender upright vase. Very hardy, able to withstand salt spray, frost, wind etc.
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  Aechmea caudata variegata: Red bracts and lime yellow florets appear on a metre tall, branched flower stem. This grows into a large and stately vase, 75cm H x 50cm W, with olive green leaves overlaid with cream stripes. Mid summer flowering. Flowers last ~ 6 weeks. Good pot plant, excellent as large ground cover, Best in light shade but can take full sun if acclimatised. Very hardy, able to withstand salt spray, frost, wind etc.
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  Aechmea caudata variegated: Red bracts and lime yellow florets appear on a metre tall, branched flower stem. Arching, finely variegated grey green leaves, form a tall but slender upright vase. Very hardy, able to withstand salt spray, frost, wind etc.
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  Aechmea chantinii: Olive green leaves banded with silver. The flower spike has large drooping bracts of red, with a branched cluster of red and yellow flowers at the top. Absolutely stupendous.
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  Aechmea coelestis: At flowering, the pink bracts and stem are covered in a white fuzz, giving it a most curious appearance. Light, baby blue petals appear from the tips. After flowering, jet black berries form, often with seed in them. The berries can stay on the plant for some months. Can withstand light frosts.

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  Aechmea comata: Cute little flower tufts of bright yellow and red sit on 30-50cm stems above this small size Aechmea. The light green leaves are tinged with lilac in high light. A tough Aechmea that is adaptable to most situations.

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  Aechmea comata 'Makoyana': Red bracts and lime yellow florets appear on a metre tall, branched flower stem. Arching, finely variegated grey green leaves, form a tall but slender upright vase. Very hardy, able to withstand salt spray, frost, wind etc.
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  Aechmea 'Covata': An excellent landscape or patio plant. It is very adaptable, producing long dark green leaves in deep shade and grey green short leaves in full sun. Large torch like flower heads of red and yellow appear on short stems in late spring to Christmas. Forms a fast growing dense clump of medium size, spiky rosettes.
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  Aechmea dealbata: The flower spike looks like a slightly smaller version of Aechmea fasciata, but more heavily dusted with silver. Silver banded bronze undersides to the leaves and contrasting green uppersides. The growth habit is upright and stiff, making it a good feature plant. Under strong but indirect light, the entire plant will turn bronze. Sensitive to cold, and best out of direct sunlight.

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  Aechmea distichantha var glaziovii: A lovely plant, with a medium size rosette of dark green leaves, lightly banded with silver on the undersides. Smaller than the other A. distichantha varieties and less heavily spined. The flower spike is soft pink, with purple flower petals.

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  Aechmea 'Exotica Candystripe': In late autumn or early winter a flower spike in candy pink and blue tops the white variegated plants. Good ground cover, or epiphyte or indoor pot plant. Full shade, or some morning sun. Can take light frosts if planted under trees.

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  Aechmea 'Exotica Mystique': A dramatic hybrid, unique to the Exotica nursery, where it was bred. Large plants nearly a metre high and over a metre wide. In high light the rich red leaves turn a deep maroon. The flower spike reaches over a metre high and has large stem bracts the colour of the plant. The flower clusters are arranged on the top half of the flower spike and consist of bright yellow waxy looking clumps, out of which the tiny orange petals appear. Cold sensitive. Full sun bleaches the colour out of the leaves, so best in strong but dappled light.

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  Aechmea fasciata: A stunning landscape and house plant, probably the most famous Bromeliad after the Pineapple. Green leaves banded with silver. The stunning pink pyramidal flower head has blue petals. The flower remains in colour for several months. A medium size urn shaped rosette.

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  Aechmea fasciata 'Morgana': Green leaves heavily banded with silver, giving the plant a silver grey appearance. The stunning pink pyramidal flower head has blue petals. This cultivar is more vigorous and more silvered than the orginal species, growing approximately 20% larger. The flower remains in colour for several months. A medium size urn shaped rosette.

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  Aechmea fasciata 'Primera': Similar to Morgana, but with smooth leaves. Green leaves heavily banded with silver, giving the plant a silver grey appearance. The stunning pink pyramidal flower head has blue petals. This cultivar is more vigorous and more silvered than the orginal species, growing approximately 20% larger. The flower remains in colour for several months. A medium size urn shaped rosette.

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  Aechmea fasciata purpurea: This Brazilian selection of purpurea has lovely dark purple leaves, banded with silver. The plants are slightly smaller and slower growing than fasciata, with a lighter pink flower head. Very striking and dramatic.

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  Aechmea fendleri: An impressive brush of lavender coloured flowers on a pink stem which is dusted with a white bloom. The stem can reach a metre in height, and the flowering display last several weeks, followed by delightful blue berries. A large rosette of green leaves with a slight silver tinge completes the picture.

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Aechmea guapariensis: Copper coloured, strap shaped, serrated leaves form a rosette 50cm H x 50cm W. Flowering mid summer with colourful pine cone like flowers. Very tough plants that are great for rock gardens, banks or cliffs. Adaptable from partial shade to full sun, with the leaves colouring to rose in full sun. Salt spray, wind and frost tolerant.
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  Aechmea 'Little Harve': A stunning plant which grows to a reasonably large rosette of green leaves with a silver dusting. The leaves blush red under high light levels. Imposing flowers with large pink/red scape bracts and orange yellow flowers.


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  Aechmea lueddemanniana 'Mend': Simply sumptuous. One of the most striking Bromeliads in existence. Beautiful wide stripes of cream down each side of the leaves, which turn shocking pink in bright light.

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  Aechmea lueddemanniana var. rubra: A large stately plant with up to a 1m spread. Looks good as a pot plant or accent plant in the landscape. The foliage is bronze red, which intensifies in good light. The stunning flower spike has lavender petalled flowers that develop into white berries. These last for several months, gradually turning purple.

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  Aechmea mexicana: One of the larger Aechmeas, which look great in Terracotta pots or as an accent plant in the garden. Light grey/green leaves which have a rose colouration in bright light. The tall flower stalk has rose coloured flowers followed by very long lasting gorgeous white berries.

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  Aechmea nudicaulis cuspidata: A spectacular plant for placing in Bromeliad trees. Produces bright red and yellow flower spikes just on Christmas. Can be grown over rocks or on the ground also, where it is equally spectacular. The flower stem is more open and hangs slightly compared to var. nudicaulis.
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  Aechmea nudicaulis 'Mary Hyde': Similar to the other nudicaulis varieties in flower appearance and plant shape, but with cream variegated leaf margins. A dramatic plant which looks great planted on Punga walls or nestled in trees. The cream margins and stunning flower spikes can be seen from a distance.
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  Aechmea nudicaulis nudicaulis: As with all the varieties of nudicaulis, this is a tough tubular plant with prominent spines. It doesn't have much root system, so can be grown easily as an epiphyte in relatively harsh conditions. It produces bright red and yellow cylindrical upright spikes in mid to late summer, which are clearly visible from a distance of at least 20 metres. This group of plants look spectacular placed in trees.
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  Aechmea orlandiana: A bizarre beauty with tough, heavily spined, leathery leaves which are wavy in appearance. The patterning is superb, with zigzags and spots of deep maroon and black over light green leaves. The flower spike consists of red bracts and bright yellow petals, which gradually turn into purple berries. Although the plant appears very tough, it is rather frost sensitive.. Full sun is best for leaf colour. Very slow growing.
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  Aechmea pectinata: These stunning plants can reach over one metre wide. The mottled green leaves are liberally splashed with vibrant pink, and the leaves turn this colour from the tips to nearly the base at flowering. Great for using as a focus plant in a tropical landscape. Also looks spectacular placed in the top of an old tree fern stump.

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  Aechmea phanerophlebia: A large imposing vase-shaped rosette of silver and green banded leaves which are quite heavily spined. Reaches a height and spread of half a metre as a single plant. Relatively slow growing. The outer leaves curve down, while the inner leaves form a tube which supports the dramatic flower spike. The spike consists of many rose pink to red spiky bracts, which last for months in colour. A striking plant for landscaping with rocks and succulents or as a balcony plant in full sun.
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  Aechmea pimenti - velosoi: Tight spiky clumps of green foliage that take on a red tinge in full sun. Autumn flowering. Very tough plants, use in trees or stumps as an epiphyte or clumped in rocky or dry areas. Prefers full sun. Can withstand moderate frosts.
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  Aechmea ‘Pink Rocket’: A lovely hybrid of Aechmea fendleri and Aechmea fasciata, with the best of both species. Similar flower spike to Aechmea fasciata, but more elongated and with rosy pink, almost red bracts topped with purple flowers. In high light the leaves take on a beautiful pink colour, overlaid with silver. In shade, this colour is lost completely, to green leaves overlaid with silver.

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  Aechmea 'Sauny': Prolific grower, forming dense clumps of shiny green leaves. Autumn / winter flowering, with pink bracts and unusual green petals. Full shade, or some morning sun. Can take light frosts if planted under trees.

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  Aechmea spectabilis: A large and impressive Aechmea, with glossy green leaves that tinge red in strong light. the rosette can reach more than 1m in width. The multiple branched flower stem reaches more than 1m in height and is comprised of many pink berry like flowers tipped with red petals.

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  Aechmea 'Suenios':
A cross between A. recurvata var. benrathii and a cylindrata. Tight spiky clumps of green foliage that take on a red tinge in full sun. Autumn flowering. Very tough plants, use in trees or stumps as an epiphyte or clumped in rocky or dry areas.
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  Aechmea winkleri: A relatively small, well shaped rosette of green leaves that are tinged with purple at the tips. The bright red flower stem tipped with yellow flowers looks like a miniature Christmas tree. The flower spike stays in colour for many weeks.

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  Alcantarea geniculata: Reaches a span of about 1m, with wide, glossy green leaves. The flower spike reaches a metre high, with deep pink bracts and creamy yellow branches. Very sought after for its size and beauty. This plant can be acclimatised to cope with full sun, or shade. Reasonably frost hardy and able to cope with wind and salt spray.
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  Alcantarea imperialis 'Rubra': One of the giants. This Bromeliad grows to a span of more than 1.5 metres, although it takes up to ten years to get to this size. The thick red flower spike reaches up to 2.5 metres in height, producing hundreds of slightly fragrant white flowers. The leaves are quite leathery and tough and the plant can withstand relatively cool nights for a Vriesea as it is native to mountains near Rio de Janeiro at an elevation of 1,500 metres. In bright light, the leaves take on a deep red cast. Previously named Vriesea imperialis. 5-7cm plants for
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  Ananas bracteatus: This species is native to coastal areas of Brazil. It needs full sun to develop the intense red colouration on the spiky leaves. At flowering, a bright red pineapple forms, which initially is surrounded by a ring of brilliant blue petals.
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  Billbergia amoena 'Red': Glossy wine red leaves form a moderate size rosette. The new pups arise from relatively long stolons. One of the true 'climbing Bromeliads'. The upright flower spike has prominent bright red bracts and pale green flowers tipped with blue.
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  Billbergia distachia rubra: Use this as a dense ground cover, or to climb the trunk of palms or pongas. Has several flushes of orange/red semi upright flower spikes from winter through to summer. Leaf colour changes from dark green in shade to a reddish green in full sun.
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  Billbergia 'Foster's Striate': Formerly called pyramidalis Striatum. Open rosette of green leaves with heavy cream bands running down the sides of the leaves. A striking plant even when not in flower, but in flower is spectacular.

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Billbergia 'Gloria': Tight tubes of ivory coloured leaves with a green tinge form an open vase 20cm H x 20cm W. The short-lived pink and purple, hanging flower stem is quite striking. Ideal for planting on walls, in a hanging basket or as an epiphyte. The ivory colour is great for setting off other plants. Best in partial shade to full shade. Quite tender due to the leaf colouring. Protect from frost.

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  Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman': Wide vases of dark burgundy, banded with silver on the underside of the leaves make this a striking plant, well suited for planting high in trees. The hanging flower spike is also stunning. Very hardy and adaptable from shade to full sun. However, grow in partial shade to get the best leaf colour and plant shape.
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  Billbergia nutans: Flowers in early spring with pink hanging flowers. Leaves are held in a thin, upright vase. One of the most durable Bromeliads. Forms a very dense, weed suppressing ground cover.
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  Billbergia 'Santa Barbara': A relatively small but very attractive Billbergia, with cream and green stripes, which become flushed with pink in good light. Small flower stems with pink bracts and green flowers.
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  Billbergia vittata: A slow growing but striking Billbergia. The spectacular short lived hanging flower stem is salmon pink with deep purple flowers. Ideal for rock walls, planted in a hanging basket or as an epiphyte. Quite hardy at -5°C in the open.
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  Billbergia 'Windii': Relatively wide grey green leaves form an open rosette. The flowers consist of large rose pink bracts, blue and green flowers. The flower stem often hangs down lower than the plant, so this is ideal for a hanging basket or as an epiphyte.
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  Billbergia zebrina: Tall tubes of green leaves heavily banded with silver, which develop shades of bronze in strong light. Large rose pink bracts cover the hanging flower spike. Long greenish yellow petals make for an unusual combination. Very hardy and can be grown in a wide range of light levels.
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  Biltanthus 'Mead': Leaves of medium green speckled with pink. The pink markings intensify in high light levels till the whole plant is nearly pink. A relatively small rosette, with the pups held close so the plant develops a bushy appearance over time.

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  Biltanthus 'Red Burst': A slow growing but attractive hybrid, with a small, flattish rosette of deep bronze red which intensifies in strong light. The small flowers are quite inconspicuous. Easy to propagate and very much at home scrambling through rocks. The colour will hold even in full sun, although best colour acheived in light dappled shade.
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  Cryptanthus 'Cascade': One of the more attractive Cryptanthus, with a habit of sending its pups out on long cascading stolons. In bright light the leaves go pinky bronze. In low light the predominant colour is green. White flowers cluster in the centre of each rosette. Excellent for hanging baskets or for placing in the top of a hollowed out punga. As terrestrials though, most Cryptanthus need a reasonable amount of soil around the roots.

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  Cryptanthus 'Dusk': For Cryptanthus, quite large rosettes of wide, heavily serrated leaves of copper red in good light.

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  Cryptanthus 'Red Bird': Small rosettes of slender, wavy red-rose leaves, edged with deeper red and coated with silver underneath.

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Fascicularia bicolor: Clumps of tough, spiky grey/green foliage, 40cm W x 20cm H. Over time the multiple offshoots form a tight mat of plants. Summer flowering, with the leaves flushing bright red and blue petalled flowers coming up in the centre. Really tough plants that orginate from Southern Chile and Argentina, so excellent for Desert or Mediterranean style garden, dry rocky areas, cliffs and cold regions. Fully terrestrial.

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  Neoregelia 1001: Soft lavender centre colour lasts for many months. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full shade also. Hardy at -3°C if planted under evergreen trees.

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  Neoregelia 1003: Tough leaves of mid green randomly splashed with dark pink spots and partial bands. At flowering, the light red, almost pink centre colour lasts for many months. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full sun also. Hardy at -3°C if planted under evergreen trees.

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  Neoregelia 1004: Olive green leaves for well-shaped rosettes of tough leaves. At flowering, the amethyst centre colour lasts for many months. Semi shade produces best foliage colour. Hardy at -3°C if planted under evergreen trees.


Neoregelia 1011: Centre colour lasts for many months. Prolific, up to 2 pups per year. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full shade also. Hardy at -3°C if planted under evergreen trees.


Neoregelia Hybrid 1015: Tough, leathery rosettes of dusky green up to 15cm H x 30cm W. Soft rose colouring in the centre at flowering. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts.


Neoregelia Hybrid 1018: Pink leaf colour holds all year round. Prolific, up to 2 pups per year. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Slight shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full sun also. Hardy at -3°C.

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  Neoregelia 1020: Purple centre colour lasts for many months. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full shade also. Hardy at -3C if planted under evergreen trees.

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  Neoregelia ‘Amazing Grace’: An old cultivar, but a very lovely one and not often seen as it is a little cold sensitive for Neoregelia. Best in dappled shade and warm northern gardens. Fairly slow growing.

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  Neoregelia 'Aztec': Up to 50cm W x 20cm H Prolific, more than 2 pups per year. Great as border plant in sunny landscapes, over rock walls or as an epiphyte. Prefers full sun to bring out leaf colour. Can take moderate frosts.
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  Neoregelia carolinae var. marechalii: A lovely form of carolinae with green leaves tinged orange. The rosette center at flowering can display a great diversity of colors from rosy red to vermilion or reddish purple, fading towards the tips.

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  Neoregelia carolinae Meyendorffii ‘Albomarginata’: Relatively small rosettes of glossy deep green leaves with thick white stripes down each side and typically crimson red centre at flowering. In high light the leaves will tinge strongly with the same colouring as the centre.

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  Neoregelia carolinae var. tricolor: One of the oldest variegated carolinae varieties, but still one of the most popular. Stripes of cream and green overlaid with pink in good light. At flowering, the whole plant becomes tinged with red, particularly near the centre.


Neoregelia carolinae x plutonis: Up to 25cm W x 15cm H. Centre turns deep maroon at flowering. Lasts for months. Great pot plant, or as a ground cover in open gardens. Prefers bright light with some morning sun to bring out leaf colour. Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia carolinae x 'Vulcan': A good hybrid with red leaves splashed and tinged with green. At flowering the center turns shocking pink, making an interesting contrast to the leaves.

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  Neoregelia concentrica 'Lavender Lady': A beautiful cultivar of Neo concentrica. Broad apple green leaves form a flat rosette which at flowering turns deep lavender in the centre.
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Neoregelia concentrica x marcon: Up to 20cm H x 40cm W Soft rose colouring in the centre at flowering. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia 'Crimson Nest': Crimson red tapered leaves tinged green form a well shaped rosette. The inner leaves turn dark red at flowering, holding that colour for many months. Does well in medium to bright light, but avoid midday sun.
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  Neoregelia ‘Debbie’: A stunning red Neoregelia. The leaves are wide and glossy dark green, but from a young age show tinges of red. At flowering, nearly the whole plant turns vibrant, fire engine red, staying that way for months on end. Ideal for bright shade in the garden, or as a pot plant indoors.

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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Dark Fantasy': Stunning rosettes of dark burgundy red leaves, up to 20cm H x 45cm W. At flowering, the centre darkens further. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light or full sun to bring out red leaf colour. Can take slight frosts.
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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Dark Goddess': Glossy green leaves that develop a dusky pink centre at flowering time. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Diablo': Up to 20cm H x 45cm W. At flowering, the centre turns dark blood red, which lasts for months. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out red leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Ebony Beauty': Large tough rosettes of burgundy leaves, speckled with green. Great as border plant in sunny landscapes, over rock walls or as an epiphyte. Prefers full sun to bring out leaf colour. Can take moderate frosts.
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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Flame': Glossy green leaves that develop an intense rich red centre at flowering time. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Flamingo': Glossy green leaves that develop a dusky pink centre at flowering time. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Lilac Dream': Up to 15cm H x 30cm W. Centre leaves turn lilac pink. Great accent plant in open landscapes or an awesome pot plant. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full shade also. Frost sensitive.

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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Red Glory': Rosettes of strawberry red leaves lightly splashed with green, up to 20cm H x 30cm W. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light or full sun to bring out red leaf colour. Can take slight frosts.
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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Sassy Red':
Up to 20cm H x 45cm W. At flowering, the centre turns rich crimson, which lasts for months. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out red leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts
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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Velvet': A sumptuous hybrid bred for New Zealand conditions by Exotica. Released for the first time at the 2003 Ellerslie Flower Show. Fantastic for modern subtropical and Pacifica style landscapes. Intense colour that keeps all year round in shade or dappled light. Ideal against pale or lime green backdrops and groundcovers. Stunning indoor plant, or in dappled shade outdoors. Grows to approximately 50cm high and wide.
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  Neoregelia 'Exotica Purple Wave': A slow growing rosette up to 20cm W that gradually forms a woody stem up to 50cm H, topped with spiralled, wavy purple leaves. Almost never flowers. Great pot plant. Prefers bright light with some morning sun.  Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia 'Fireball': Small fiery red rosettes up to 15cm H x 15cm W which grow from long stolons. Colour intensifies at flowering. Great in hanging baskets, rock walls, placing in trees or on tree fern stumps. Prefers full sun for intense leaf markings. Can take slight frosts.
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  Neoregelia 'Fireball' x 'Avalon': A good 'Fireball' hybrid with highly coloured reddish leaves splashed with green. Compact rosettes which spread via stolons. Quite hardy and adaptable to full sunlight.
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  Neoregelia 'Fireball' x plutonis: A unusually coloured hybrid with dark maroon, almost purple leaves forming a medium sized, flat rosette. Best colour is produced in full light.
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  Neoregelia 'Grace': Up to 20cm H x 45cm W. Red tinted, glossy green developing a hot red centre at flowering. Ideal for bright shade in the garden, or as a pot plant indoors. Prefers bright light to bring out leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts.

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  Neoregelia 'Jackie' F2: Wide green leaves tipped with dark red fingernails and mottled underneath with rusty colouration. Fast growing Neo.
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  Neoregelia 'Julian Nally': Another tough Neoregelia, a cross between N. spectabilis and N. marmorata, but with marbled maroon and green leaves with pink red tips and without such obvious silver banding on the undersides. Ideal for rocky areas or steep banks. Flowers are violet, but generally insignificant.
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  Neoregelia 'Lambert's Pride': Up to 20cm High x 40cm Wide. Great as an accent plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light to bring out leaf colour, but avoid midday sun. Can take slight frosts. Quite hardy and adaptable to full sunlight.
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  Neoregelia ‘Lila’: A lovely hybrid that develops an incredible glow of almost iridescent lilac pink near flowering. These plants prefer shaded conditions, with some morning or late afternoon sun to maximise leaf colour.

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  Neoregelia 'Maggies Pride': A striking Bromeliad, with dark green leaves that have a broad central stripe of cream surrounded by more slender cream stripes. The whole plant tinges pink in good light, with the center turning dark pink at flowering.

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  Neoregelia marmorata: A striking Neoregelia, ideal for landscaping or on a balcony. Heavily marbled foliage, dark maroon overlaid with so many green spots, to give the effect of green leaves marbled with maroon. High light levels increases the colouring till the maroon turns wine red and almost glows. Lately we have seen several stunning clumps grown in full sun over scoria boulders.
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  Neoregelia 'Mottles': Stout, heavily mottled leaves of dark maroon with green spots give this plant a striking appearance and hardy nature for the toughest of landscapes. The harsher the environment, the brighter the maroon speckling. Similar to Neo. marmorata, but more highly coloured and with shorter leaves.
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  Neoregelia 'Noble Descent': This excellent hybrid provides a good contrast to most other Neos. Light green leaves, which turn nearly yellow in strong light, provide a background for light speckles of red, with red leaf tips and a red centre at flowering. Very tough plant.
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  Neoregelia ‘Painted Lady’: A fascinating hybrid with the most complex colour scheme of shocking pink, fire engine red, lime green and grass green all on the same leaves.. This is a plant that needs to go where it can be seen close up to appreciate its intricate beauty. The glossy leaves are reasonably hardy. Best planted in very light dappled shade to bring out the best colours.

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  Neoregelia 'Perfecta Novar': Centre colour lasts for many months. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full shade also. Great as an accent plant, or as a striking indoors plant. Hardy at -3C if planted under evergreen trees. Needs free draining soil.

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  Neoregelia 'Perfecta Tricolor': One of the oldest variegated carolinae varieties, but still one of the most popular. Stripes of cream and green overlaid with pink in good light. At flowering, the whole plant becomes tinged with red, particularly near the centre.

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  Neoregelia 'Princess Caroline': Formerly known as carolinae Princeps. At flowering, the centre turns intense amethyst. Attractive shiny green leaves, forming a medium sized flat rosette. Semi shade produces the best foliage colour and form, but can be planted in full shade also.

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  Neoregelia 'Proserpine': Very large concentrica variety, with broad leathery leaves that turn blue in the centre at flowering.
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  Neoregelia 'Purple Star': This Neoregelia hybrid has leathery leaves which develop a soft maroon shade in high light. At flowering the centre develops shades of light amethyst and dark purple.. The wide leaves have a lovely half twist to them when young, which eventually straightens out to a wavy leaf when older to form a well shaped rosette about 40cm across. Prefers shaded conditions, with some morning or late afternoon sun to maximise the leaf colour.

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  Neoregelia 'Royal Robe': Was listed as 1002. Glossy green leaves, randomly splashed with dark pink spots and partial bands. At flowering, the shocking pink centre colour lasts for many months. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full sun also. Hardy at -3°C if planted under evergreen trees.

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  Neoregelia 'Ryan's Red': Up to 30cm H x 45cm W. Great accent plant in open landscapes or an awesome pot plant. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full sun also. Can withstand moderate frosts.
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  Neoregelia 'Sailors Warning': Relatively small open star-shaped rosette of bright red glossy leaves with green spots and longitudinal splashes.
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  Neoregelia ‘Scarlet Charlotte’: A very stunning hybrid. Perfectly rounded rosettes of light green glossy leaves, with nearly the whole plant turning scarlet pink at flowering. Gorgeous. Ideal as an indoor pot plant, or for intense colour under light shade in the garden.

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  Neoregelia ‘Sharlock’: Fairly large upright rosettes to 50cm diameter of rich deep burgundy leaves with green spots and slight bands. The leaf tips are rich red. A very striking plant in any situation, but best suited to high light, preferably full sun.
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  Neoregelia ‘Sharlock’ x ‘Painted Lady’: Rich dark red leaves lightly flecked with lime green near the centre and flecked with burgundy on the remainder of the leaves. At flowering the centre turns a purple shade of burgundy.

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  Neoregelia 'Stoplight': Glossy green leaves with scarlet tips form a medium to large rosette. The centre turns bright pink at flowering. Quite literally like a stoplight.

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  Neoregelia spectabilis: A tough customer, often called the 'Painted Fingernail' plant for its red leaf tips. Underside is maroon with white cross bands. Ideal for rocky areas.
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  Neoregelia spectabilis Rubra: Even tougher than the species, this variety has leathery leaves of bronze speckled with maroon and tipped with dark pink. One of the toughest Neos around and ideal for rocky areas, over banks and in dry spots.
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  Neoregelia 'Stormy Weather': A small Neo with olive green leaves, heavily banded with purple brown stripes and spots. Quite tough and suitable for sunny sites.
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Neoregelia 'Tangerine': Great accent plant in open landscapes or an awesome pot plant. Semi shade produces best foliage colour, but can plant in full shade also. The tangerine shading to the leaves develops into a red centre at flowering. Frost sensitive.

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  Neoregelia 'Yellow Bird': A leathery leafed, compact rosette of light green leaves, lighted spotted and banded, mainly underneath, with dark reddish brown.
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  Nidularium 'Exotica Ruby Red': Up to 70cm H x 70cm W. Deep wine red star shaped flower spike lasts for ~ 12 months. Great pot plant, also as an epiphyte or under dense foliage in the garden. Prefers dappled light. Can take light frosts.

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  Nidularium fulgens: This is quite simply a stunner. One of the best of this genus. The leaves are grass green, beautifully spotted with forest green and with prominent but soft spines down the edges. Nestled in the distinctive foliage at flowering time is a star of fire engine red, which lasts for more than 6 months, fading to cerise as it ages.

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  Nidularium lubbersii: Up to 30cm H x 40cm W. Wine red star shaped flower spike lasts for ~ 12 months. Prolific, more than 2 pups per year. Great pot plant, also as an epiphyte or under dense foliage in the garden. Prefers deep shade.

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  Nidularium procerum: Similar to N. terminale (which may be a hybrid of N. procerum), but the leaves tend to be thinner and longer, with slightly more colour. The flower bracts are also longer and thinner, making for a more open star.

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  Nidularium procerum ‘Red Form’: A new form of procerum that we imported from Brazil. Fairly tall for a Nidularium, with strappy, wine coloured leaves up to 50cm high. Deep wine red star shaped flower spike lasts for ~ 12 months. Great pot plant, also as an epiphyte or under dense foliage in the garden. Prefers dappled light.

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  Nidularium 'Rusty': Excellent for adding colour interest to a green area. Red star shaped flowers held above the foliage last in colour for months. The serrated leaves turn burgundy in high light.

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  Nidularium terminale: Scarlet red star shaped flowers which last for months, are held well above the attractive light green serrated leaves (which turn pinkish in high light).

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  Orthophytum disjunctum: Forms dense clusters of silvery coloured spiky rosettes with undertones of pink when grown in full sun. Great for rock gardens. Ideal with succulents and cacti. Best in full sun or light shade. Needs free draining soil. Frost tender.
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  Orthophytum saxicola: Gorgeous little stars of translucent orange. The leaf edges appear spiny, but in fact are quite soft, like Nidularium fulgens. Sends out its pups on long stolons, making it ideal to use over the edge of a wall.
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  Portea petropolitana extensa: This is a spectacular plant, with large rosettes up to 1 metre high and wide.. The flower spikes are stupendous, reaching head height and carrying many beautiful flowers.. After flowering, masses of dark purple berries form.

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  Quesnelia arvensis Red Form: 50cm H x 45cm W. Flower head of shocking deep pink stays in colour for ~ 8 weeks. Great for rockeries, on punga stumps, in mixed borders. Full sun, with some midday shade. Can also grow well in full shade. Cold hardy to -3C

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  Quesnelia imbricata: The very showy orange red flower spike stays in colour for up to a month, above a tube of pale green leaves. Quite hardy and can be grown in a range of light levels.

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  Quesnelia humilis: 15cm H x 10cm W. Winter flowering. Flowers last ~ 4 weeks. Good for rockeries, or as epiphytes on Pongas and under trees. Grows best in full shade, or with some morning sun. Cold hardy to -3C

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  Quesnelia lateralis: Azure blue flower petals contrast well with scarlet pink flower bracts and the scarlet pink flower stem. Winter flowering. Quite a stunner in flower and a good landscape plant when not in flower. Medium sized rosette of tubular green leaves with attractive short black spines and faint silver banding underneath which becomes more prominent in high light.

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  Quesnelia liboniana: Slender tubes of green leaves, tapered near the tip. The curious flower spikes have only 5-10 flowers, but these appear as long tubes of reddish orange tipped with deep blue, almost purple petals. Quite interesting and ideal as a pot plant or as a clump of epiphytes on Pongas.

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  Tillandsia baileyii: Twisted, bulbous shape. 10cm H x 5cm W. Pink branched flower spike with mauve petals.  Use as an epiphyte, on ponga or driftwood. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -3°C
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  Tillandsia brachycaulos: 10cm H x 15cm W. Forms clumps quickly. Whole plant flushes shades of red at flowering with purple flowers. Use as an epiphyte only, mounted on ponga, rocks or driftwood. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -3°C.
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  Tillandsia caput-medusae: Twisted, bulbous shape. 10cm H x 5cm W. Bright red branched flower spikes stay in colour for ~ 6 weeks.  Use as an epiphyte, on ponga or driftwood. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -3°C.
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  Tillandsia fasciculata: Stiff silver leaves form rosettes up to 30cm H x 50cm W. Flower spike can reach 40cm high. Develops several offsets after flowering. Best as an epiphyte, on ponga or driftwood. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -1C. Keep dry over winter.
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  Tillandsia flabellata: Multiple slim pencil-like flower spikes of bright red at flowering, out of which appear the small violet blue flowers. This is the smaller form, with red leaves. It grows quite easily and can be used as either a potted plant indoors or as an epiphyte in the garden.
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  Tillandsia fuchsii gracilis: 6cm H x 5cm W. Forms clumps quickly. Rose coloured flower spike with mauve flowers. Use as an epiphyte only, mounted on ponga, rocks or driftwood. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -3°C.
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  Tillandsia ionantha: 3cm H x 5cm W. Forms clumps quickly. Whole plant flushes red at flowering, purple flowers stay in colour for ~ 6 weeks. Use as an epiphyte only, mounted on ponga, rocks or driftwood. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -3°C.
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  Tillandsia juncea: 20cm H x 7cm W. Clumps quickly. Silvery grass like foliage that flushes reddish at flowering. Mauve flower spike with purple flowers. Use as an epiphyte, on ponga or driftwood. Prefers partial shade to full sun. Cold hardy to -3°C
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  Tillandsia juncea 'Juncifolia': 15cm H x 7cm W. Clumps quickly. Grass like foliage that flushes reddish at flowering. Mauve flower spike with purple flowers. Use as an epiphyte, on ponga or driftwood. Prefers partial shade to full sun. Cold hardy to -3°C
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  Tillandsia secunda: A large Tillandsia with stiff silver leaves forming a very stately plant. At flowering the tall branched flower spike can reach to 1m high. After flowering has finished, numerous small pups develop on the flower stem, from the old flowers. These can be removed and grown on.
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Tillandsia somnians: Individual plants grow to 20cm H x 20cm W. Tall branched flower spikes can reach to 3m high. After flowering, several pups develop on the flower stem. As an epiphyte, on ponga or driftwood, or scrambling through shrubs. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -1°C.
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  Tillandsia stricta: Perfectly shaped clusters of stiff, pointed, silver green leaves form this small Tillandsia. The flower bracts are bright red, topped with blue petals. A hardy Tillandsia which has spread across most of the South American region. Quite stunning in flower and easy to grow.
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  Tillandsia tenuifolia: Clusters of stiff, pointed, silver green leaves form tight clumps no larger than a sparrow. The flower bracts are shocking pink, tipped with bright blue petals. Spring flowering. Quite stunning in flower and easy to grow.
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  Tillandsia tricolor melanocrater: 15cm H x 15cm W. Forms clumps quickly. Whole plant flushes shades of red at flowering with violet flowers. Use as an epiphyte only, mounted on ponga, rocks or driftwood. Full sun, or part shade. Cold hardy to -3C.
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  Tillandsia usneiodes: The fascinating Spanish Moss that is seen in any films of the deep South of the USA. Hanging in dense strands from large Oaks, these also do well outdoors in the North Island of this country. Silver grey strands of tiny plants, which produce tiny yellow green flowers. Each clump we sell is at least 20cm long and is threaded through a shell or on a piece of Punga for easy mounting. For best results, mist regularly with rainwater, or hang outdoors in the rain. Prefers light shade and good air movement. Does well when misted with a very dilute foliar feed occasionally.
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  Vriesea 'Exotica Zulu': This is one of our new Vriesea incurvata hybrids, with a deep blood red, almost purple coloured spear. The flower spike looks especially dramatic over the bright green foliage. Best in full shade and quite happy in frost free gardens.


  Vriesea corcovadensis: A small Vriesea which has the appearance of a Tillandsia. Green leaves heavily speckled with red at the base, particularly in high light. The pups arise off long stolons, so the plant climbs well if placed at the base of Pungas or similar. The pale red flower spike is tipped with cream florets.
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  Vriesea flammea: Great for overhead planting or hanging baskets. This small Vriesea has thin green Tillandsia like leaves. The pups are produced prolifically on long stolons arranged symmetrically around the mother plant. The flower spike is red tipped with lime.
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  Vriesea guttata: A gorgeous little plant comprised of light green leaves covered with small spots. The hanging lavender pink flower spike is covered in white powder, giving it a soft appearance. Yellow/green petals emerge over time. Ideal for hanging baskets or placed in trees so the flower can hang down.

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  Vriesea philippo - coburgii: Medium to large, well formed rosettes of leathery leaves. In low light, the leaves remain deep green with brick red leaf tips. In high light, the leaves turn light green, almost yellow, and the distinctive red tip marking becomes more prominent. Quite striking, particularly when in flower, as the red and yellow flower spike can reach up to 1.5 metres high. Quite hardy.

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  Vriesea platynema 'Rubra': A gracious plant with large deep green almost blue leaves with faint banding, tipped with purple and with purple shading underneath. The 50cm tall flower spike has numerous purple to red flower bracts with creamy yellow petals.

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  Vriesea platynema variegata: One of the more beautiful members of this stunning group. Large deep green almost blue leaves with faint banding and thin stripes of white, tipped with purple and with purple shading underneath (almost too many colours!!). If that wasn't enough, the 50cm tall flower spike has numerous purple to red flower bracts with yellow petals. Sold as seedlings in 5cm tubes.

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  Vriesea Yamamoto Hybrid: A medium sized Vriesea, with soft green leaves tinged with bronze in high light. Sword shaped flower spike with a red centre and bright yellow tips. Very attractive. Prefers morning sun or late afternoon sun. Looks stunning in Bromeliad trees or on punga walls where the flower colour really comes through.

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Wittrockia cyathiformis: Up to 1.2m wide x 1.2m high. Slow growing and produces less than 1 pup per year. Dramatic feature plant for indoors or out. Bright light for best foliage colour, avoid full sun. Copes with slight frosts under overhanging foliage.


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  Wittrockia ‘Leopardinum’: An exotic looking plant, with wide, glossy, light green leaves, edged with black spines and dappled with large patches of dark green, almost black spots.. The spots are more prominent near the tips, which are fully coloured. In high light the plant takes on shades of rose.